Jaguar Mark II 3.4 Manual Overdrive 4dr Petrol, Manual, Regency Red, 30,000 miles

Reserved




  • Body: Saloon
  • Transmission: Manual
  • Mileage: 30,000
  • Fuel Type: Petrol
  • Registered: 1967 (E)
  • Doors: 4
  • Engine Size: 3.4

The Mk2 Jaguar was produced in Coventry from 1959 until 1967. Powered by the XK engine in 2.4, 3.4 and 3.8ltr engine sizes with standard manual transmission, Overdrive was optional, as was automatic transmission and power assisted steering.

Being one of the fastest saloon cars of the Sixties the Mk2 was favoured by the criminal fraternity, the police were also armed with stripped down versions with increased power, especially for the motorways which had no speed limits back then. The fictional character, Inspector Morse made a Mk2 famous in the long running TV series starring the late John Thaw.

Finished in Jaguar Regency Red with grey leather trim and dark blue carpets, according to the Jaguar Heritage Certificate within the history file, the car was built on the 8th March 1967 and was registered on the 20th March 1967 by the Leeds Jaguar dealer. The production data confirms our car was fitted with the favoured manual transmission with Overdrive and power steering as it left the factory. Chrome wire wheels set the car off well.

This car is rather special. The condition inside and out gives the impression of a car much younger than 50 years of age. Then you look closer and notice the bodywork and interior shows the lovely patina of a car that’s had a top quality restoration earlier in its life and has been cherished since. Then you take a detailed look at the super history file of the car and it all becomes clear – The car has covered just 26,000 miles since 1986 with no less than 28 MOT certificates nicely presented in a folder, there are a couple missing in the early ‘90’s when the car was being restored.

Again, nicely documented, this restoration started slowly in and around 1990 when a new ‘Mota Lita’ steering wheel was purchased for the car and the interior wood was professionally re veneered and the instruments restored, again professionally and documented. Then all of a sudden the improvements suddenly turned into a full blown professional restoration with no stone unturned, all highly documented and a credit to the quality of workmanship of the restorer – the car is in a wonderful condition still today with a lovely paint finish and super panel gaps. This restoration was unusual for a car like this at the time as it was obviously instructed by the owner to be the best of the best and no expense was spared.

The job took 30 months and invoices are on file for £27,582 and there is a professional valuation for £30,000 for the car dated soon after.
Obviously cherished following the restoration, the owner used the car sparingly covering just a few hundred miles per annum until 1999 when the car was sold on.

There is a sales invoice in the file dated September 1999 when a classic car dealer in the north sold the car for £26,000. Presumably another wealthy, fastidious client had purchased the car and rather than collecting it himself, instructed it to be delivered direct to a Jaguar specialist to embark on more expenditure! Again a detailed programme of improvements – mostly mechanical – was agreed upon and some £9,041 was spent on the car in stages up until early 2001, including a full engine re build and conversion to accept unleaded fuel.

Since then, the car has covered less than 6,000 miles and performs faultlessly. There are various invoices on file for routine maintenance but nothing extraordinary. We have fitted a new set of quality radial tyres and renewed the rear brake pads, not because of wear but age related.

On the road the car feels fast even by todays standard, it pulls hard through all gears with no abnormal transmission noises, all 4 gear synchromesh are good and the overdrive operates on 4th gear as it should. The car pulls up well on the Coopercraft 4 pot front brakes.

The values of these cars are rising. This car is very unusual in that it had huge amounts invested in it when they were almost throw away items, just think of how much this restoration would cost nowadays – I would guess in excess of £100,000

available for viewing in our showroom now